Lions At The Dinner Table

Thank you for any good that I may have done, I'm so sorry about the bad.
Sep 17 '14

rockees:

a ferocious beast

172,138 notes (via rockees)

Sep 17 '14
jamaicaismyplayground:

Talented Jamaican Artisit Taj Francis

jamaicaismyplayground:

Talented Jamaican Artisit Taj Francis

(Source: tajfrancis)

56 notes (via jamaicaismyplayground & tajfrancis)

Sep 17 '14
madeofpatterns:

slashmarks:

beedibix:

living400lbs:

I think somebody had fun with this wall. 

#jareth put physics back where you found it or so help me

this is a nice wall. I like this wall.

!!!!!!!!!!!

madeofpatterns:

slashmarks:

beedibix:

living400lbs:

I think somebody had fun with this wall. 

this is a nice wall. I like this wall.

!!!!!!!!!!!

(Source: johnnyclasper.co.uk)

81,677 notes (via anastasiajeanettemarie & mandrag)

Sep 17 '14

If black folks are honest, many of us will admit to both internally and vocally balking at the very “free” ways that we have heard white children address their parents in public. Many a black person has seen a white child yelling at his or her parents, while the parents calmly respond, gently scold, ignore, attempt to soothe, or failing all else, look embarrassed.

I can never recount one time, ever seeing a black child yell at his or her mother in public. Never. It is almost unfathomable…

White children in general are raised to be Columbus, to “discover” the world anew and then to manipulate and order the universe to their own liking. If we take away the colonizing impulse in living this way, I think it would be amazing to have the luxury of raising black children who also view the world as a space of their own making, a space to be explored, a space to build anew. A space where occasionally, simply because you live there, you can opt to walk in the middle of the street instead of being confined to the sidewalk, much as you might sling your leg across the arm of a chair in your own home, because it is home.

But for so many black children, these kinds of frivolous choices will get you killed or locked up. For black children, finding disciplinary methods that instill a healthy sense of fear in a world that is exceptionally violent toward them is a hard balance to find.

The thing is, though: Beating, whupping or spanking your children will not protect them from state violence. It won’t keep them out of prison. Ruling homes and children with an iron fist will not restore the dignity and respect that the outside world fails to confer on adult black people.

495 notes (via thatdudeemu & theblackamericanprincess)

Sep 17 '14

(Source: lexiealley.com)

178,371 notes (via aleygrashouse & lexienalley)

Sep 17 '14

(Source: kamilamb)

182 notes (via nicolebehariefans & kamilamb)

Sep 16 '14

angrywocunited:

tedx:

"The goal is not to turn kids into your kind of adult, but rather, better adults than you have been. Progress happens because new generations grow and develop and become better than the previous ones.”

From Adora Svitak’s talkWhat adults can learn from kids.” In her talk, Adora makes a case for why adults shouldn’t underestimate kids. And they shouldn’t. Kids are doing amazing things. Let’s just take a second to think about how Adora organized her first TEDxYouth event when she was just 12.

This weekend, young people around the world are attending, organizing, speaking at, and watching TEDxYouthDay events — TEDx events dedicated to the ingenuity of kids worldwide. Every year we’re taken aback by the amazing things that come out of these events, and we think you should be, too. Find a TEDxYouthDay event near you to attend or watch live online here.

this is so effing important and i’m super impressed after read her transcript

41,968 notes (via daniellemertina & tedx)

Sep 16 '14
portraits-of-america:

     “In Korea, almost nobody sits directly on the grass—it’s considered dirty. We put down a towel or a newspaper first, or we just squat. Here, people sit everywhere—on the grass, in the hallways, on the ground—and they put their backpacks on the floor in the classroom! I never see that in my country: our parents and teachers tell us from an early age that such things are dirty. In Korea, no one ever enters the house with their shoes on. The first time I sat on the grass here, it felt weird. Now, I don’t care. But after three years in this country, I still hug my backpack if there’s no empty seat next to me to put it on.” 
Minneapolis, MN

Same.

portraits-of-america:

     “In Korea, almost nobody sits directly on the grass—it’s considered dirty. We put down a towel or a newspaper first, or we just squat. Here, people sit everywhere—on the grass, in the hallways, on the ground—and they put their backpacks on the floor in the classroom! I never see that in my country: our parents and teachers tell us from an early age that such things are dirty. In Korea, no one ever enters the house with their shoes on. The first time I sat on the grass here, it felt weird. Now, I don’t care. But after three years in this country, I still hug my backpack if there’s no empty seat next to me to put it on.” 

Minneapolis, MN

Same.

483 notes (via portraits-of-america)

Sep 16 '14

(Source: kingjaffejoffer)

999 notes (via thatdudeemu & kingjaffejoffer)

Sep 15 '14

serenaslam:

Grand Slam winning reactions x18

415 notes (via jamaicansash & serenaslam)

Sep 15 '14

blackfeminismlives:

shirleychisholmproject:

Shirley Chisholm a woman ahead of her time…

My president.

unbossed & unbought

5,046 notes (via daniellemertina & shirleychisholmproject)

Sep 15 '14

15,055 notes (via nefer-soul & jahblessbobmarley)

Sep 15 '14

ecklecticsoul:

Childish Gambino Interview At The Breakfast Club Power 105.1 

[x]

25,184 notes (via nefer-soul & ecklecticsoul)

Sep 15 '14

inspiresswag:

malcolm x

20,376 notes (via scandal-whipped & inspiresswag)

Sep 15 '14
joshuatb:

Connect.

joshuatb:

Connect.

1,122 notes (via blindest-optimism & lifeonsundays)